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Pompeii, Italy

Basilica

Circa 2nd century BC; large rectangular room divided lengthwise by 28 columns into 3 naves, row of demi-columns against the walls; remains of the monumental building of the Tribunal in the background; nucleus of the Forum as it was the main place of the public life of the town

Basilica

Circa 2nd century BC; monumental building of the Tribunal overlooking a large rectangular colonnade; nucleus of the Forum as it was the main place of the public life of the town

The Macellum

Name of the city market, 2nd century BC; remains of the portico surrounding the area of the Forum

The Colonnade

Oldest part with tufa stone columns on the southern side of the Forum, executed at the Samnite epoch (5th century BC); Ionic columns of the Basilica in the foreground

The Colonnade

oldest part with tufa stone columns on the southern side of the Forum, executed at the Samnite epoch (5th century BC)

Public Administration buildings

Southern side of the Forum; remodelled in opus latericium after the earthquake in 62AD; rectangular rooms with central niches; used as meeting room for the administrators, legal archive (tabularium) and hall of the decurions

Temple of Apollo

Primitive nucleus back to 6th century BC, current layout from the 2nd century BC and embellished after the earthquake in 62AD; view of "Apollo shooting arrows" statue from the back with the altar, the podium and the colonnaded portico in the background

Odeon (Small Theatre)

1st century BC; up to 1'000 spectators; view of the cavea, orchestra and proscenium from the top

Temple of Apollo

Primitive nucleus back to 6th century BC, current layout from the 2nd century BC and embellished after the earthquake in 62AD; view of "Apollo shooting arrows" statue from the back with the colonnaded portico in the background

Temple of Isis

End of the 2nd century BC; porticoed courtyard with stuccoed Corinthian columns, temple on a podium in the center; rebuilt in opus latericium after the earthquake in 62AD

Commemorative arch, Temple of Jupiter (Capitolium)

Back to 2nd century BC; large arch, high podium with an entry staircase on the front, fluted columns surrounding the cella

Temple of Fortuna Augusta

1st century BC, command of politician Marcus Tullius; remains of the cella with marble columns and Corinthian capitals

Temple of Jupiter (Capitolium)

Back to 2nd century BC, flanked by two commemoratives arches; Forum Granary on the left with large brick pilasters housing a market, 62 AD

Memorial Arch

At the beginning of Via Mercurio, associated with Caligula because of an equestrian statue found nearby and may be originally located over the arch

House of the Baker

Back to 2nd century BC, remodelled after 62 AD earthquake; vaulted owen, millstones of lava rock on a base in opus incertum

UNESCO World Heritage Site, lost for nearly 1700 years before its accidental rediscovery in 1748, Pompeii provides an extraordinarily detailed insight into the life of a city at the height of the Roman Empire.